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Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of effects of competition on variation in the quality and cost of medical care found in the catalog.

effects of competition on variation in the quality and cost of medical care

Daniel P. Kessler

effects of competition on variation in the quality and cost of medical care

by Daniel P. Kessler

  • 213 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Medical care, Cost of -- Econometric models,
  • Medical care -- Quality control -- Econometric models

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDaniel P. Kessler, Jeffrey J. Geppert.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 11226., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 11226.
    ContributionsGeppert, Jeffrey J., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination22 p. ;
    Number of Pages22
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17625970M
    OCLC/WorldCa59007862

    the effects of health status on quality and costs. To document the association between health care cost and quality and identify sources of heterogeneity between studies, we conducted a systematic review of evidence from published literature that assesses the association between health care costs and quality. See also: Print.   The Cure For Health Care Is Competition. doctors who outperform on both cost and quality still cannot effectively attract and keep patients better than the doctors who under : Capital Flows.

    Prices for health care services vary significantly among providers, and it's often difficult for patients to determine their out-of-pocket costs before receiving care. Some consumer advocates, employers, and health plans are pushing for greater reporting of the prices of health care services as a way to encourage consumers to choose low-cost, high-quality providers and to promote competition. The true effect of licensure on quality is an empirical question, since economic theory suggests that licensure can have opposing effects on quality. Licensing requirements can increase quality by restricting entry only to highly-qualified professionals, or it can decrease quality by causing less competition, higher prices, and more do-it.

    Octo - High quality and lower costs can indeed go hand-in-hand for hospitals, according to new data from Advisory Board, if healthcare organizations can successfully reduce unnecessary variations in care.. An analysis of more than hospitals revealed that the highest quality facilities delivered lower-cost care for 82 percent of diagnoses included in the study, indicating that.   In principle, managed care should lead to better and more cost-effective care because managed care organizations involve medical teams and have an incentive to reduce costs .


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Effects of competition on variation in the quality and cost of medical care by Daniel P. Kessler Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Effects of Competition on Variation in the Quality and Cost of Medical Care Daniel P. Kessler Graduate School of Business Stanford University, Hoover Institution, and NBER [email protected]Cited by: We estimate the effects of hospital competition on the level of and the variation in quality of care and hospital expenditures for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with heart attack.

We compare competition's effects on more-severely ill patients, whom we assume value quality more highly, to the effects on less-severely ill, low-valuation patients.

In contrast, high-valuation patients in less-competitive markets receive less intensive treatment than in more-competitive markets, and have significantly worse health outcomes. Since this competition-induced increase in variation in expenditures is, on net, expenditure-decreasing and outcome-beneficial, we conclude that it is by: We estimate the effects of hospital competition on the level of and the variation in quality of care and hospital expenditures for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with heart attack.

We compare. The Effects of Competition on Variation in the Quality and Cost of Medical Care Introduction Recent studies have emphasized the importance of vertical differentiation in markets for hospital services.

The Effects of Competition on Variation in the Quality and Cost of Medical Care We estimate the effects of hospital competition on the level of and the variation in quality of care and hospital expenditures for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with heart attack.

In the treatment of hip fracture, competition increased costs and length of stay, while increasing rates of death or institutionalization. In the treatment of stroke, competition decreased costs and length of stay and produced inferior outcomes.

by: Kessler D P, Geppert J J. The Effects of Competition on Variation in the Quality and Cost of Medical Care. Journal of Economics and Management Strategy. ; 14 (3)– Landon B E, Zaslavsky A M, Beaulieu N D, Shaul J A, Cleary P D.

Health Plan Characteristics and Consumers' Assessments of Quality. Health Affairs. ; 20 (4)– Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The study, based on U.S. health-care data fromprovides important new information about the effects of competition on prices for office visits paid by preferred. The effects of competition on variation in the quality and cost of medical care Author: Daniel P Kessler ; Jeffrey J Geppert ; National Bureau of Economic Research.

This research has yielded conclusive evidence that competition restrains prices. 1 The effects of competition on the quality of inpatient care are less conclusive, in part because available measures of quality are crude (e.g. inpatient mortality) or have ambiguous interpretations (e.g.

Wide variation in the delivery of clinical services, resulting in differences in the cost and quality of care, can be observed repeatedly among similar providers with similar patients across the. We estimate the effects of hospital competition on the level of and the variation in quality of care and hospital expenditures for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with heart attack.

We compare competition’s effects on more-severely ill patients, whom we assume value quality more highly, to the effects on lessseverely ill, low-valuation patients.

Effects of Increased Competition on the Quality of Care The ultimate goal of the provision and utiliza-tion of technologies in the medical care process is a healthier population. The road to this end result, though, is made up of a great many other factors that determine health status.

Genetic, en-vironmental, lifestyle, and other factors not re. This study assesses the impact of competition on quality and price in the English care/nursing homes market. Considering the key institutional features, we use a theoretical model to assess the conditions under which further competition could increase or reduce quality.

A dataset comprising the population of 10, care homes was by: competition on the quality of inpatient care are less conclusive, in part because available measures of quality are crude (e.g. inpatient mortality) or have ambiguous interpretations (e.g. length of stay, number of procedures), and in part because it is difficult to separately identify quality from price effects.

In health reform, competition in health market, as one of the strategies which increases care quality and decreases costs, is a matter of controversy, [40] and the findings of various studies in.

3 U.S. Government Accountability Office, Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Competition and Other Factors Linked to Wide Variation in Health Care Prices, Pub.

GASO, August Cited by: Does Competition in the Out-Patient Sector Improve Quality of Medical Care. – Evidence from Administrative Data Abstract We use administrative data from the largest sickness fund in Germany to analyze the relationship between the district density of general and medical practitioner and the quality of care provided to the frail elderly.

Daniel P. Kessler & Jeffrey J. Geppert, "The Effects of Competition on Variation in the Quality and Cost of Medical Care," NBER Working PapersNational Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. Schmalensee, Richard. Prologue: Most of the proposals advanced in the s for rationalizing the use of medical care derived chiefly from an economic model —more consumer cost sharing, the development of alternative Cited by:   Competition improves management and clinical quality Overall, we find that hospitals that faced more competition had significantly higher management scores and better clinical and financial performance.

Using the random variation in the degree of competition generated by political marginality actually made this relationship stronger.Background: Improving the quality of inpatient hospital care is increasingly attainable in a variety of settings.

However, the relationship between rising quality and costs is unclear; similarly the relationship between varying levels of quality and a patient's satisfaction remains poorly defined. Methods: We use data from the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS) based in